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WEIRD LOVEMAKERS - DVD-R

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Meet The Weird Lovemakers. “They do everything!”
Fresh out of a youth-detention center without a single yen between them, bad-boy buddies Al and Masaru are soon up to their dirty tricks again as they hotwire a car and head down to Shonen beach. On the way, they pick up old acquaintance Yuki, a beautiful but dangerous pan-pan girl who makes a living cock-teasing clueless Americans and fleecing them of everything they’re worth. As the rowdy threesome of ne’er-do-wells cruise the beachside strip, Al spies the newspaper reporter who got him put away. After beating him to a bloody pulp, he abducts the reporter’s girlfriend Fran and rapes her in the sand as Masaru and Yuki frolic in the waves. But it’s not the last time Al will cross paths with Fran – she later reappears claiming she is carrying his child….

A sublime example of the wild world of the Taiyozoku or Sun Tribe movies that appeared in Japan around the early Sixties inspired by U.S. titles like The Wild Ones and Rebel without a Cause, and were kicked off in 1956 by Season of the Sun, the movie adaptation of the ultimate youths-on-the-loose novel written by Shintaro Ishihara, now none other than the Governor of Tokyo! Also known as Season of Crazed Fever, this Sun Tribe doesn’t stray far from the formula nor from the beach, giving us a world of smoky jazz bars and sweltering summer heat, populated by cool cats and swinging chicks, youths racing from one thrill to another in a riot of rape, pillage, and free love. -- Butaniku




SKU: 35061
Format: DVD-R
Year: 1960
Color: B&W and Color Dubbed English
Starring: Tamio Kawachi
Co-starring: Eiji Gou
Other cast: Yuko Chishiro, Noriko Matsumoto
Directed by: Koreyoshi Kurehara

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